Camden County High Point Trip Report

Date: June 17, 2001
Author: Dan Case

These two areas are amid large suburban subdivision complexes. They can most easily be reached from Exit 3 of the New Jersey Turnpike, which puts you right on NJ 73. Several miles down, you will know you have entered Camden County by the signs for Voorhees Township. This does mean, however, that you will do these in reverse order from the way Mike Schwartz wrote them up, so some new directions are in order.

one area (14-16 Tenby Chase Drive) 1.25 miles NW of Marlton Lakes (210+ ft)

The first light you will encounter after crossing the county line on 73 is the William Feather Drive, mentioned in Mike's report. Turn left on it into the Sturbridge Lakes development. It's a mile or more down this winding residential street to Tenby Chase, but that's the intersection Mike mentioned and it's a cinch from there.

The homeowners were not present this day to inquire about exploring their property. Mike's right that you can really just walk on the lawns (there are no sidewalks on this side of the street) a few feet in from the street on both properties and claim this area. The higher ground around the foundations of the houses, to me, meets my recently-constructed rule (see my Union NJ report) and so doesn't count.

USGS BM 3/4 mile NW of Marlton Lakes (219 ft)

Go back out to 73 via William Feather or Signal Hill Road as per Mike's directions. Turn left and follow south to Cooper Road, some distance to the south past some large retail complexes on either side of the road.

The only amendment needed to Mike's directions is that it's a little longer both to Longwood Road (in the Sturbridge Woods complex) along Forest Hills Drive (which, BTW, makes a big loop and connects with itself at one point) and along Longwood to the cul-de-sac (more like 0.2 miles).

Once there, there has been no change as far as construction. The sides of the cul-de-sac slope up, heavy with the sandy soil that characterizes most of South Jersey, but there has been no clearing or houses going up here (and judging by how far back the nearest houses are down the road, there probably won't be for a while yet).

The trail, of sorts, leaves on the left side. The tape flags will get you through the laurel patches and pines to the benchmark OK, but you need to pay close attention as some of them are quite faded and old. It may be necessary if you lose the route to stand right next to one flag and look carefully around the woods in order to see the next one. Nor is the shortest distance between flags always the path of least resistance. On the whole the exercise was a small version of finding summits and canisters on places like Chestnut Bald. It was actually kind of fun and challenging in a way I didn't expect a CHP located amid suburban sprawl to be, without being too aggravating.

It takes approximately several hundred feet of this to get to the BM, which you'll be able to spot by the witness marker, a sign sticking several feet up right over the BM, set in a small concrete pedestal. There is a small clearing around it, but no paths leading out in any direction.